Fraser Basin Council

HIGHLIGHTS > $9.5 billion - Cost Estimate of Protecting Metro Vancouver from Sea Level Rise by 2100

$9.5 billion - Cost Estimate of Protecting Metro Vancouver from Sea Level Rise by 2100

posted on 3:13 PM, December 20, 2012
It could cost $9.5 billion to implement flood-protection improvements in Metro Vancouver by 2100 to address sea level rise, according to a report by Delcan commissioned by the B.C. government.

It could cost $9.5 billion to implement flood-protection improvements in Metro Vancouver by 2100 to address sea level rise, according to a report by Delcan commissioned by the B.C. government.

The report, Cost of Adaptation - Sea Dikes and Alternative Strategies, covers more than 250km of coastal shoreline in Metro Vancouver including the Fraser River downstream of the Port Mann Bridge. The report explores options such as new or expanded dikes, floodwalls where there is insufficient room for dikes, breakwaters or barrier islands to dissipate wave energy, restrictions on building in the floodplain and better emergency response systems. 

 

The ReTooling for Climate Change website is a first stop for elected officials and staff of local governments, First Nations, and everyone else interested in learning about climate change adaptation. Browse these pages for some of the latest information on climate change, local impacts and adaptation planning. Search TOOLS & RESOURCES to find key material from across North America and around the globe.  The idea behind the ReTooling site is to save you time in preparing your own community for climate change and integrating adaptation into local planning and decision-making.

Climate Change Challenges for Communities

The Earth’s climate is changing, and with these changes come many consequences for communities – both positive and negative. Some of the major impacts associated with climate change that cities and towns around the world will experience are increased risks of extreme weather events (such as floods and droughts), changes to natural ecological systems, and effects on human-built systems (such as transportation networks and buildings). Communities in British Columbia, across Canada and around the world can take action to prepare for and respond to climate change in two main ways:

  1. Reduce further climate change by taking mitigation actions that reduce greenhouse gas emissions (e.g., using public transit) or increase the earth’s ability to  absorb these emissions naturally (e.g., preserving or planting trees)
  2. Plan for changes by taking adaptation actions to prepare for expected changes in the climate (e.g., sea-level rise) and become more resilient to unexpected changes (e.g., extreme weather events).

Adapting to climate change and its impacts is the focus of this ReTooling site. How ready are you?

PROGRAM PROFILE

BC Regional Adaptation Collaborative

The BC Regional Adaptation Collaborative (BC RAC), Preparing for Climate Change: Securing BC’s Water Future, is a partnership initiative with Natural Resources Canada and the Climate Action Secretariat to help BC communities adapt to climate change and its impacts. Visit the Fraser Basin Council website to learn more about the initiative and its projects.

About ReTooling for Climate Change

The ReTooling for Climate Change website is a project of the Fraser Basin Council to support local governments and First Nations in BC in preparing for climate change adaptation. The site is funded through the BC Regional Adaptation Collaborative (BC RAC), a partnership program of the Fraser Basin Council and the BC Ministry of Environment – Climate Action Secretariat, with funding from Natural Resources Canada and other in-kind contributions.

Find out more about the Fraser Basin Council and the BC RAC at www.fraserbasin.bc.ca.

We want to hear from you

Share your ideas and suggestions for new resource links to Jim Vanderwal (), Senior Program Manager, at the Fraser Basin Council.

Also worth a visit

On this site you’ll find links to many helpful websites on climate change adaptation. For steps communities can take to mitigate climate change, check out the Climate Action Toolkit website.